OAS might begin political trial of Bolsonaro, document says

A confidential report by the Organization of American States suggests the United States should charge Brazil’s President Jair Bolsonaro with various violations of human rights, including possible mass murders, if it wants to save…

OAS might begin political trial of Bolsonaro, document says

A confidential report by the Organization of American States suggests the United States should charge Brazil’s President Jair Bolsonaro with various violations of human rights, including possible mass murders, if it wants to save the organization from a “serious and irreparable” fate, according to two Brazilian news outlets.

The presidents of El Salvador, Paraguay and Suriname signed the Paraguayan agenda on Friday for the OAS summit beginning on Jan. 16 in San Salvador, according to El Diario de Hoy and O Globo.

According to the OAS, the agenda was done on Thursday in response to Bolsonaro’s meeting with Panamanian President Juan Carlos Varela. A Brazilian representative in the Americas section said it was “an abuse of the powers” of the United Nations body to tell countries what they should do with other governments, according to the news sites.

“In my opinion the agenda is absolutely outrageous,” the Brazilian representative was quoted as saying in a report by El Diario de Hoy. “This is a violation of the United Nations charter. If they want to keep us as a representative of the whole continent, they will need to implement what they have just established on Thursday.”

The adoption of the agenda contradicts the doctrine of peaceful coexistence adopted in 1948 by the OAS, the representative was quoted by the news outlets as saying. In effect, the agenda authorizes the U.S. to interfere in internal affairs and not only in countries considered by the U.S. to be its allies, but also to countries perceived to be enemies.

In addition to atrocities allegedly committed by Bolsonaro’s political movement, the document also mentioned violence linked to the illegal armed conflict led by the far-right movement in the 1980s and 1990s, the organizations said.

“In summary, the submission of a politicized agenda and the possible initiation of a disciplinary review against President Bolsonaro are emblematic of the instability and dysfunctionality of the institution and threatens the viability of the organization,” according to a statement from the Brazilian foreign ministry, according to the news sites.

“The submission of a political agenda … introduces unacceptable and erratic measures, which jeopardize the principle of non-intervention, the OAS Charter, and undermines the inviolability of its autonomy.”

The news websites cited the lack of human rights defenders in Latin America and disregard for OAS executive guidelines in December 2016, which called for the establishment of an independent body to assess the human rights situation in Brazil following Bolsonaro’s election.

Of the 20 members of the OAS, Brazil has the third largest number of human rights defenders after Venezuela and Haiti, according to the OAS.

The OAS referred to the abandonment of Bolsonaro’s agenda as an error and rejected it on Thursday night. “The OAS mission in Brazil, having expressed its abhorrence of this political agenda, reiterates its commitment to the independence of this organization and the respect of its rules and laws,” according to a statement.

The manual identifies a possible “denunciation” to the World Court and an “excommunication” of a country by the organization.

However, Bolsonaro recently made comments in which he stated that he would not resign.

“This government will be able to meet the expectations of the public, there is a functioning state, the president is working with all his energy. My term is far from being over, so it will not be possible to call the elections now. I will be much stricter in dialogue with the left, the right has no place here, they are here to kill the President,” Bolsonaro said.

Brazilian Foreign Minister Ernesto Araujo said the OAS had agreed to hold an extraordinary meeting on March 4. “This is a meeting between nations. The government of Brazil has not recognized the timing of this meeting, and neither has the government of the United States, so this process will take its course.”

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