Northern Lights dazzle and deafen while revealing stunning firefall

The magnetic fields of the three giant volcanic islands, located in Canada, Chile and Iceland, don’t just cause seismic activity and earthquakes in the Southern Hemisphere. Now, they’re also responsible for dazzling and deafening…

Northern Lights dazzle and deafen while revealing stunning firefall

The magnetic fields of the three giant volcanic islands, located in Canada, Chile and Iceland, don’t just cause seismic activity and earthquakes in the Southern Hemisphere.

Now, they’re also responsible for dazzling and deafening displays of the Northern Lights.

The northern lights were spotted to “substantial” numbers in Canada and even reached within 12 miles of Anchorage, Alaska last night, according to the Aurora Twitter page.

The colors of the northern lights are caused by a natural phenomenon called ‘firefall,’ which is a ‘saturated haze’ that reflects the sun’s rays when they hit a mountain’s surface after a hot and heated cloud of magma has cooled.

According to information from IMARZA, a global organization for the field of space weather research, the northern lights, or aurora borealis, are more visible in winter in the Northern Hemisphere (the ‘bear’ in “aurora borealis” means darkness) compared to the southern hemisphere due to closer latitudes and the shorter night duration.

Auroras display themselves at around sunrise, according to Dr. Dan Jaffe, a meteor expert for NASA.

Auroras are created by the collision of charged particles with the Earth’s atmosphere. One of the main culprits is a type of solar storm called coronal mass ejection.

CMEs are propelled by some of the solar wind (the space-traveling particles from the sun that can sometimes interfere with satellite and radio transmissions and create solar storms.

“Not all flares are created equal. Whereas you may get a few CMEs that are potentially strong enough to knock satellites out, you might also get a few that are not,” Jaffe said in a statement.

Coronal mass ejections frequently come from the sun as “extraordinary flares” and have the ability to disrupt our space-borne technology and natural wireless communication.

However, the “firefall” is sometimes the only indicator of solar activity.

According to some fans, firefall is even more striking than the stunning amount of fire in a fireworks display.

The photos of the spectacular northern lights show glowing arches, complex twists and rays of lights in the sky above some of the famous canyons in Alaska.

For those not to fortunate enough to experience the Aurora Borealis in real life, check out some of the amazing aurora footage on YouTube.

FOX News’ Aaron Bracy contributed to this report.

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