Menthol cigarettes not saving UK smokers as much as expected

Written by Staff Writer Throughout most of last year the fight against smoking in the UK was given fresh impetus when the Government revised its anti-smoking strategy, which included plans to bring an end…

Menthol cigarettes not saving UK smokers as much as expected

Written by Staff Writer

Throughout most of last year the fight against smoking in the UK was given fresh impetus when the Government revised its anti-smoking strategy, which included plans to bring an end to menthol cigarettes by 2025.

The tobacco industry was quick to respond with their own plan to quell what has become a popular way to smoke in the UK.

In October, the UK’s biggest tobacco company, Imperial Brands, launched its own version of menthol, but it has now been revealed the move appears to have failed.

The number of new smokers between 2015 and 2016 was cut by 1 million to 3.5 million, and fewer than 1% of smokers quit, according to the Department of Health.

According to figures published on Thursday, on average 1.75 billion cigarettes were sold in the UK each week in September, although in December the figure fell to 1.64 billion, down from 1.74 billion last year.

While Philip Morris International (PMI) shares did rise in early trading after the news was announced, the news sent shares of PMI’s British rival British American Tobacco (BTI) down and other cigarette companies up.

Worldwide, more than 3.2 billion people are currently smoking, down from 3.8 billion in 2017, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). Tobacco kills almost half of its users, WHO says.

The company is confident that they can beat the health warning that all cigarettes must be sold with, including menthol — since the brand has more than 35% of the market.

“There’s no significant evidence to suggest that menthol is harmful,” the company said in a statement, reports Bloomberg.

WHO recommends that all cigarettes should have health warnings covering 50% of the front and 65% of the back, up from 50% currently.

Smoking also causes throat cancer, oral cavity cancer, lung cancer, and certain types of cancer of the larynx and the esophagus, and heart disease.

The increasing number of graphic images on cigarette packs were introduced in Australia in 2014 and they have since been implemented in multiple countries around the world.

Based on evidence that there has been a reduction in smoking rate, WHO says that tobacco control initiatives have had success in reducing the number of people who smoke. But in countries where the action to reduce tobacco consumption is not as successful, the agency called for more action.

The number of people in Australia, for example, who were either using or trying to quit smoking fell from 17.5% in 2004 to just 6.9% last year, health data showed.

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