Deadly new virus from Toronto causes Canadian outbreaks

Outbreak of deadly Ebola-like virus finds first victims in Toronto, though initial diagnosis declared as ‘most likely due to factor we can’t explain’ The deadly virus that has made its way from Toronto to…

Deadly new virus from Toronto causes Canadian outbreaks

Outbreak of deadly Ebola-like virus finds first victims in Toronto, though initial diagnosis declared as ‘most likely due to factor we can’t explain’

The deadly virus that has made its way from Toronto to the small town of Mervin, Saskatchewan, has now made its way to Ontario, north of Toronto.

As of the weekend, provincial authorities reported a total of 356 cases of the coronavirus, named CVID-19 or, perhaps better known colloquially as “Toronto cold”. Of those 356, 127 have died. A few Canadians are still in critical condition.

Toronto cold: the epidemic of the year Read more

Though previously confirmed cases in the southwestern Ontario city were thought to have been related to travel, only one person has been isolated for subsequent testing.

On Saturday, officials from the Centre for Disease Control, Public Health Ontario and the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care announced that there had been four cases of CVID-19 recorded in the province – and all four deaths had been found to be associated with travel to Toronto.

Canada’s new Ebola patient was in hospital’s high-risk unit Read more

World Health Organization officials declared that the first of the four deaths was caused by CVID-19. Though officials determined the death was “most likely due to factor we can’t explain”, their description of the virus at large made clear it was likely responsible.

“The virus can live in the saliva, fluids, faeces, blood, urine and semen of an infected person and spreads rapidly through the air, through couches and other surfaces. CVID-19 can be spread through direct contact with the contaminated clothing, surfaces or objects of an infected person, or from a contaminated surface to an un-cleaned surface.”

The influenza vaccine covers CVID-19, though the average person in the developed world cannot even begin to get vaccinated until they have fully recovered from the virus. The outbreak brings the total number of cases since the virus made its first appearance in 2013 to 1,145. In 2015, CVID-19 was linked to 28 deaths, with 83 additional cases under investigation.

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