A $1.3B Supernatural Series and a News Story About White Supremacists Are What’s on the Front Pages of This Week’s Papers

On Oct. 23, Sen. Ted Cruz declared that the Senate health care bill was “dead.” The next day, the New York Times delivered another one of its lengthy stories on President Trump and his…

A $1.3B Supernatural Series and a News Story About White Supremacists Are What’s on the Front Pages of This Week’s Papers

On Oct. 23, Sen. Ted Cruz declared that the Senate health care bill was “dead.” The next day, the New York Times delivered another one of its lengthy stories on President Trump and his chaotic presidency. “In His Own Little World, Trump Doesn’t Care What You Think,” that splashy front-page story ran twice in separate sections of the paper. Articles about a mysterious shooter in Chicago a week earlier (“In Parkland, School Shooter Had Blown Own Holes”) and the rise of white nationalism (“‘White Identity’ and Why America’s Populist Anxiety Is Coming at Us From Everywhere”) — all appeared prominently on the Times front page. The paper’s internal data shows that the increase in white nationalist activity since last year is “staggering.” “The Fascists Re-Elect Trump — and There’s Nothing We Can Do,” proclaimed the Washington Post. Its front-page piece discussed the people who had come out to congratulate Donald Trump on his victory in Tuesday’s midterm elections. (There were “more than 2,000 mentions of ‘Fascist’ on Twitter” that day.)

The Los Angeles Times took a deep dive into the life of Zsa Zsa Gabor, who died on Tuesday at age 99. The article examines the life of a woman, who over the course of a century, “lived in her own private universe that few other people ever knew.” | Photo by John Shearer, Invision/AP

Did Google play a role in “stifling fake news?” That was the title of a story that appeared on the front page of the Washington Post on Monday. “Fake News Stifles Online Inclusion, Discrimination, Study Finds,” asked its headline. “In 8 Years, Google Has Saved ‘Little’ From Dislike Button Abuses, Scrutiny,” it continued. Those were just two headlines from this week’s newspaper, which featured stories and photos of dozens of people, including members of the congress, who played a major role in elections or are standing in their way.

The New York Times has found another troubled corner of Russia: unregistered Russian charitable foundations. Some of the foundations are giving away charitable funds that do not comply with Russian law, a Times investigation found. “Russian Nonprofits Evade Taxes, Rebuke Western Authorities,” was the opening headline, followed by a slew of stories about the nefarious activities of one such organization, Reova, and others. The investigation follows up on a 2017 piece by the Times that “revealed how corrupt Russian foundations were allowing a small group of Russian oligarchs to abuse foreign exchange markets by moving money offshore for tax purposes,” according to the Times.

In Week 26 of the ABC podcast Serial, the Serial podcast, listeners will hear updates on the story of Minnesota serial killer Hae Min Lee. New episodes will air Wednesday and Sunday and three more podcasts in November. The newest addition is “Season 2,” which “will introduce Hae’s last conversation with her boyfriend, Paul, before the night she was killed, the day he got a drug arrest and the last time he spoke to her mother,” the show’s Twitter account said. | Photo by Zach Gibson/Getty Images

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